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Indeed, it could hardly have been undertaken at all, but for the existence of that excellent institution, the University Long Vacation,-an institution against which a few bold hands have been lately lifted, but which nevertheless, in the PREFA CE. nii form in which we are familiar with it in the Colleges of Cambridge, where residence under due limitations is allowed but not enforced, has a value, for teachers and learners alike, which it would be difficult to overestimate. i 34 41 cxx1 cxxii CXxv CXXV CXXVil cxxvi cxxvii cxxviii cxxviii CXxx 42 cxxxi * The 2 woodcuts marked thus, have been prepared erpressly for this work b)y Mr. For the effect thus produced, we may compare the scene near the end of the first part of Goethe's Faust, 1 E. His political enemy, the ultraconservative Aristophanes, had unscrupulously set him down as an atheist4, though, all the while, it would appear that he had only striven for the recognition of a higher type of the divine than that which was represented in the current mythology of the day. The original is a golden sard belonging to the Hon. ix cxvi xxxii cxvii xlii cxx lix cxx lxxii cxxi lxxxviii xciii cxlviii p. The composition of Messengers' Speeches is one of the points in which Euripides excels; and in the 1 This, as remarked by Hermann, is a characteristic of all his plays that belong to a later date than 01. The quiet passage in its earlier portion, telling of the king and his attendant and their mysterious guide, stealing in silence along the glades of Cithaeron, with the few following touches of description pleasantly representing to us the glen with its rocks and rivulets and overshadowing pine-trees, has, it will be observed, the dramatic effect of heightening by force of contrast the tumultuous excitement attending the deed of horror which is the subject of the latter part of the messenger's recital. Der Frihliing iwebt schon in den Birken, [Und selbst die Fichtefiihll ihn schon! Euripides, like others who have hesitated in accepting unreservedly the tenets of a popular creed, had in his earlier writings run the risk of being misunderstood by those who clung more tenaciously to the traditional beliefs. The weapon is to be seen resting against the altar.

But the poet appears to have been conscious of this difficulty, as he makes Pentheus thireaten to put a stop to it (1. 545, 1036); and the king is only prevented from actually doing so by his anxiety to capture the Lydian stranger; but as soon as he has succeeded in this object, he becomes hopelessly entangled in toils that leave him no chance of carrying out his threat. The choral metres, a conspectus of which is given at the close of the volume, are all of them admirably adapted to give expression to the varied emotions of the votaries of Dionysus. 604-64I, is well suited as a transition from the hurried excitement of the preceding scene, to the quieter Iambic verses which immediately follow it. Of the versification of the Bacchae, according to Ilartung's Eu:. In listening to the first speech, we find ourselves in a wonderland where all is marvellous, and we feel that here, at any rate, we have one who, like Aristophanes in his lighter moods, would have been able to appreciate a creation of the fancy like the MIidsummzer Nighzt's Dream of our own poet. The subject of this quiet and easy conversation gives that repose so necessary to the mind, after the tumultuous bustle of the preceding scenes, and perfectly contrasts the scene of horror that immediately succeeds'.' Another instance of the 'lull before the storm' is noticed by a recent writer on Calderon, in 'the pretty pastoral scene' in the play called the Hair of Absalom where the sheep-shearers are pleasantly conversing with Tamar just before the arrival of Amnon and his brothers3. Is the poet who here upholds the honour of Dionysus, and maintains the belief in his divinity, the same as he who, elsewhere, allows his characters to rail unrebuked against the legends of the popular mythology, and even to deny the wisdom of Apollo, the justice of Athene, the righteousness of Zeus2, and to speak in vague terms of the very existence of the greatest of the gods'? The gem is characterized by Mr King as 'Etruscan work of the most finished kind' (King and Munro's Horace, Epod. The original is in the Berlin cabinet, and a cast of it is included in the collection mentioned on p. The woodcut is enlarged to double the scale of the gem. His wound is here indicated by a bandage round his ankle and by the 'writhing anguish' expressed in his general attitude. A Maenad with head tossed back and streaming hair, and with arms violently extended, holding a short sword in her right and part of a slain animal in her left; she wears the long chiton, and over it the nebris.

play may have been mutilated in that earlier codex by one who was unconscious of the dramatic purpose of the speeches of Agave and Dionysus. lxxi But, as a whole, it would certainly have been regarded by any Greek tragedian as unsuitable for delivery before an enormous audience, like that which assembled in the theatre of Dionysus; as 'it is impossible for a thousand people at once to be sentimental and tender on the beauties of nature'.' It may also be noticed that Shelley's description, with which the present passage has before now been unfavourably contrasted2, is not true to the facts, as it does not really correspond to the actual scenery on the way to the castle of Petrella, which he had never visited; whereas the few touches of topographical detail given in the above passage are not only beautiful in themselves, but have also the advantage of being in strict accordance with the natural scenery of Cithaeron. xiii.; Cope in Cambridge Essays for I856, 'Onz the taste for theic icttresqzcw among the Greeks'; W. The sober temper is commended (1002), the gentle life extolled (388), and practical good sense preferred to the pretence of superior intelligence. 81), the head and hair correspond to the description given by Callistratus, but the t/zyrsus appears instead of the slain animal. 60) that the Maenad of Scopas may have suggested itself to the artist as a theme appropriate to the completion of the Theatre of Dionysus at Athens in B. In the Official Gzuide it is suggested that the relief was probably inserted as a panel in the base of a candelabrum. A young Faun, who holds a crook in his right hand, is holding up the left in astonishment. The woodcut is borrowed from King's Antique Gems and Rings 11 xxx I2 (also in King and Munro's Horace Odes II xix B). In his left he holds aloft a thyrsus capped with a pine cone, and a little below this a stick cloven at its upper end is tied to the wand by a single ribband. used by Milton]; (4) Joszhua Barnes, Cambridge, 1694; (5) Miusgrave, Oxford, 1778; (6) Beck, Leipsig, 1778-88; (7) Variorum ed., Glasgow, 1821 [vol.

This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i [[

But the poet appears to have been conscious of this difficulty, as he makes Pentheus thireaten to put a stop to it (1. 545, 1036); and the king is only prevented from actually doing so by his anxiety to capture the Lydian stranger; but as soon as he has succeeded in this object, he becomes hopelessly entangled in toils that leave him no chance of carrying out his threat. The choral metres, a conspectus of which is given at the close of the volume, are all of them admirably adapted to give expression to the varied emotions of the votaries of Dionysus. 604-64I, is well suited as a transition from the hurried excitement of the preceding scene, to the quieter Iambic verses which immediately follow it. Of the versification of the Bacchae, according to Ilartung's Eu:. In listening to the first speech, we find ourselves in a wonderland where all is marvellous, and we feel that here, at any rate, we have one who, like Aristophanes in his lighter moods, would have been able to appreciate a creation of the fancy like the MIidsummzer Nighzt's Dream of our own poet. The subject of this quiet and easy conversation gives that repose so necessary to the mind, after the tumultuous bustle of the preceding scenes, and perfectly contrasts the scene of horror that immediately succeeds'.' Another instance of the 'lull before the storm' is noticed by a recent writer on Calderon, in 'the pretty pastoral scene' in the play called the Hair of Absalom where the sheep-shearers are pleasantly conversing with Tamar just before the arrival of Amnon and his brothers3. Is the poet who here upholds the honour of Dionysus, and maintains the belief in his divinity, the same as he who, elsewhere, allows his characters to rail unrebuked against the legends of the popular mythology, and even to deny the wisdom of Apollo, the justice of Athene, the righteousness of Zeus2, and to speak in vague terms of the very existence of the greatest of the gods'? The gem is characterized by Mr King as 'Etruscan work of the most finished kind' (King and Munro's Horace, Epod. The original is in the Berlin cabinet, and a cast of it is included in the collection mentioned on p. The woodcut is enlarged to double the scale of the gem. His wound is here indicated by a bandage round his ankle and by the 'writhing anguish' expressed in his general attitude. A Maenad with head tossed back and streaming hair, and with arms violently extended, holding a short sword in her right and part of a slain animal in her left; she wears the long chiton, and over it the nebris.

play may have been mutilated in that earlier codex by one who was unconscious of the dramatic purpose of the speeches of Agave and Dionysus. lxxi But, as a whole, it would certainly have been regarded by any Greek tragedian as unsuitable for delivery before an enormous audience, like that which assembled in the theatre of Dionysus; as 'it is impossible for a thousand people at once to be sentimental and tender on the beauties of nature'.' It may also be noticed that Shelley's description, with which the present passage has before now been unfavourably contrasted2, is not true to the facts, as it does not really correspond to the actual scenery on the way to the castle of Petrella, which he had never visited; whereas the few touches of topographical detail given in the above passage are not only beautiful in themselves, but have also the advantage of being in strict accordance with the natural scenery of Cithaeron. xiii.; Cope in Cambridge Essays for I856, 'Onz the taste for theic icttresqzcw among the Greeks'; W. The sober temper is commended (1002), the gentle life extolled (388), and practical good sense preferred to the pretence of superior intelligence. 81), the head and hair correspond to the description given by Callistratus, but the t/zyrsus appears instead of the slain animal. 60) that the Maenad of Scopas may have suggested itself to the artist as a theme appropriate to the completion of the Theatre of Dionysus at Athens in B. In the Official Gzuide it is suggested that the relief was probably inserted as a panel in the base of a candelabrum. A young Faun, who holds a crook in his right hand, is holding up the left in astonishment. The woodcut is borrowed from King's Antique Gems and Rings 11 xxx I2 (also in King and Munro's Horace Odes II xix B). In his left he holds aloft a thyrsus capped with a pine cone, and a little below this a stick cloven at its upper end is tied to the wand by a single ribband. used by Milton]; (4) Joszhua Barnes, Cambridge, 1694; (5) Miusgrave, Oxford, 1778; (6) Beck, Leipsig, 1778-88; (7) Variorum ed., Glasgow, 1821 [vol.

This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i \0Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W.

' lartens-Schaafhausen cabinet' Dionysos Leontomorphos. It is doubtless undramatic for the king, after ordering his attendants to capture all the Theban revellers they can find, as well as the Lydian stranger, to allow a band of Asiatic women to go on beating their drums, and dancing and singing unmolested in front of his own palace'. A chorus of aged Thebans, for instance, might have required no departure from dramatic probability, but it would have been a poor exchange for our revel-band of Oriental women, gaily clad in bright attire and singing jubilant songs, as they lightly move to the sound of Bacchanalian music. 512, observzatum est a quibusdam senarios i ps minus 50 priminum pcdema anapaeslu hzabere, et in 950 versibus solutiones 368 esse. present play we have the advantage of two such passages, in which the revels on Cithaeron and the death of Pentheus are described in narratives which are, perhaps, unsurpassed in Greek tragedy for radiant brilliancy, energetic swiftness and the vivid representation of successive incidents, following fast on one another. WVe have a similar instance of repose in Shakespeare in the short dialogue between Duncan and Banquo just as they approach the gates of Macbeth's castle (l Iacbeth I. I-9); upon which it was well observed by Sir Joshua Reynolds that 'their conversation very naturally turns upon the beauty of its situation, and the pleasantness of the air: and Banquo observing the martlets' nests in every recess of the cornice, remarks that where those birds most breed and haunt, the air is delicate. This is well shewn by the moralising refrain at the close of the successive stanzas in one of Wordsworth's poems of the imagination, called' Devotional incitements.' For this illustration I am indebted to Professor Colvin. ON THE PURPOSE OF THE PLA Y lxxv antiquity, who, in the phrase of a hostile critic, is made to describe himself as 'from the scrolls of lore distilling the essence of his wit"? The fate of his Phoenician comrades is ingeniously indicated by the overturned pitcher. Telephus, according to the legend, had at first repelled the Greeks; but Dionysus came to their help, and caused him to be tripped up by a vine, and thereupon wounded by the spear of Achilles.

They also shew a certain interdependence on one another; thus, the allusions, in the first Stasimon,, to the places where Dionysus is worshipped, find their echo in the reference to the god's own haunts in the second; the longing for liberty expressed in the second is after an interval caught up by a similar strain in the third; while the moral reflexions of the first are to some extent repeated in the last. The only other course would have involved having a chorus that was either coldly neutral, or actually hostile to the worship of Dionysus, and therefore out of harmony with the object of the play. lxix where, shortly before the tumult of the wild revels of the IValplorisnaci/t, we find Faust quietly talking to Mephistopheles about the charm of silently threading the mazes of the valleys, and of climbing the crags from which the ever-babbling fountain falls, when the breath of spring has already wakened the birch into life, and is just quickening the lingering pine'. In these denunciations of r') o'oro/v, are we really listening to the pupil of Anaxagoras, to him whom his Athenian admirers called the 'philosopher of the stage2,' to the most book-learned of the great Tragic writers of 1 Bathos of this kind is unavoidable whenever the didactic style of poetry follows closely on an instance of a higher type. 158 E, 6 KIv Kh'b S o VTro S 0X6'o0-os, Vitruvius, Book v III, Preface. Mr King informs me that he doubts the antiquity of the ' Florentine gem,' and he suggests that it may be only a fancy sketch. CADMUS ATTACKING THE SERPENT OF THE FOUNTAIN OF ARES. The wounded king of Mysia, with his helmet on his head and with shield and sword beside him, is here bending as a suppliant at an altar on which stands the oracular head of the bearded Dionysus. A., who has kindly permitted its publication, for the first time, in this volume. The original is a sard in the Leake Collection of Gems in the Fitzwilliam Museum (Case II, no. Mr King's catalogue describes it as 'designed with much spirit in the later Greek style.' LITERATURE OF THE PLA Y.

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But the poet appears to have been conscious of this difficulty, as he makes Pentheus thireaten to put a stop to it (1. 545, 1036); and the king is only prevented from actually doing so by his anxiety to capture the Lydian stranger; but as soon as he has succeeded in this object, he becomes hopelessly entangled in toils that leave him no chance of carrying out his threat. The choral metres, a conspectus of which is given at the close of the volume, are all of them admirably adapted to give expression to the varied emotions of the votaries of Dionysus. 604-64I, is well suited as a transition from the hurried excitement of the preceding scene, to the quieter Iambic verses which immediately follow it. Of the versification of the Bacchae, according to Ilartung's Eu:. In listening to the first speech, we find ourselves in a wonderland where all is marvellous, and we feel that here, at any rate, we have one who, like Aristophanes in his lighter moods, would have been able to appreciate a creation of the fancy like the MIidsummzer Nighzt's Dream of our own poet. The subject of this quiet and easy conversation gives that repose so necessary to the mind, after the tumultuous bustle of the preceding scenes, and perfectly contrasts the scene of horror that immediately succeeds'.' Another instance of the 'lull before the storm' is noticed by a recent writer on Calderon, in 'the pretty pastoral scene' in the play called the Hair of Absalom where the sheep-shearers are pleasantly conversing with Tamar just before the arrival of Amnon and his brothers3. Is the poet who here upholds the honour of Dionysus, and maintains the belief in his divinity, the same as he who, elsewhere, allows his characters to rail unrebuked against the legends of the popular mythology, and even to deny the wisdom of Apollo, the justice of Athene, the righteousness of Zeus2, and to speak in vague terms of the very existence of the greatest of the gods'? The gem is characterized by Mr King as 'Etruscan work of the most finished kind' (King and Munro's Horace, Epod. The original is in the Berlin cabinet, and a cast of it is included in the collection mentioned on p. The woodcut is enlarged to double the scale of the gem. His wound is here indicated by a bandage round his ankle and by the 'writhing anguish' expressed in his general attitude. A Maenad with head tossed back and streaming hair, and with arms violently extended, holding a short sword in her right and part of a slain animal in her left; she wears the long chiton, and over it the nebris. play may have been mutilated in that earlier codex by one who was unconscious of the dramatic purpose of the speeches of Agave and Dionysus. lxxi But, as a whole, it would certainly have been regarded by any Greek tragedian as unsuitable for delivery before an enormous audience, like that which assembled in the theatre of Dionysus; as 'it is impossible for a thousand people at once to be sentimental and tender on the beauties of nature'.' It may also be noticed that Shelley's description, with which the present passage has before now been unfavourably contrasted2, is not true to the facts, as it does not really correspond to the actual scenery on the way to the castle of Petrella, which he had never visited; whereas the few touches of topographical detail given in the above passage are not only beautiful in themselves, but have also the advantage of being in strict accordance with the natural scenery of Cithaeron. xiii.; Cope in Cambridge Essays for I856, 'Onz the taste for theic icttresqzcw among the Greeks'; W. The sober temper is commended (1002), the gentle life extolled (388), and practical good sense preferred to the pretence of superior intelligence. 81), the head and hair correspond to the description given by Callistratus, but the t/zyrsus appears instead of the slain animal. 60) that the Maenad of Scopas may have suggested itself to the artist as a theme appropriate to the completion of the Theatre of Dionysus at Athens in B. In the Official Gzuide it is suggested that the relief was probably inserted as a panel in the base of a candelabrum. A young Faun, who holds a crook in his right hand, is holding up the left in astonishment. The woodcut is borrowed from King's Antique Gems and Rings 11 xxx I2 (also in King and Munro's Horace Odes II xix B). In his left he holds aloft a thyrsus capped with a pine cone, and a little below this a stick cloven at its upper end is tied to the wand by a single ribband. used by Milton]; (4) Joszhua Barnes, Cambridge, 1694; (5) Miusgrave, Oxford, 1778; (6) Beck, Leipsig, 1778-88; (7) Variorum ed., Glasgow, 1821 [vol. This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i \0Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W. ' lartens-Schaafhausen cabinet' Dionysos Leontomorphos. It is doubtless undramatic for the king, after ordering his attendants to capture all the Theban revellers they can find, as well as the Lydian stranger, to allow a band of Asiatic women to go on beating their drums, and dancing and singing unmolested in front of his own palace'. A chorus of aged Thebans, for instance, might have required no departure from dramatic probability, but it would have been a poor exchange for our revel-band of Oriental women, gaily clad in bright attire and singing jubilant songs, as they lightly move to the sound of Bacchanalian music. 512, observzatum est a quibusdam senarios i ps minus 50 priminum pcdema anapaeslu hzabere, et in 950 versibus solutiones 368 esse. present play we have the advantage of two such passages, in which the revels on Cithaeron and the death of Pentheus are described in narratives which are, perhaps, unsurpassed in Greek tragedy for radiant brilliancy, energetic swiftness and the vivid representation of successive incidents, following fast on one another. WVe have a similar instance of repose in Shakespeare in the short dialogue between Duncan and Banquo just as they approach the gates of Macbeth's castle (l Iacbeth I. I-9); upon which it was well observed by Sir Joshua Reynolds that 'their conversation very naturally turns upon the beauty of its situation, and the pleasantness of the air: and Banquo observing the martlets' nests in every recess of the cornice, remarks that where those birds most breed and haunt, the air is delicate. This is well shewn by the moralising refrain at the close of the successive stanzas in one of Wordsworth's poems of the imagination, called' Devotional incitements.' For this illustration I am indebted to Professor Colvin. ON THE PURPOSE OF THE PLA Y lxxv antiquity, who, in the phrase of a hostile critic, is made to describe himself as 'from the scrolls of lore distilling the essence of his wit"? The fate of his Phoenician comrades is ingeniously indicated by the overturned pitcher. Telephus, according to the legend, had at first repelled the Greeks; but Dionysus came to their help, and caused him to be tripped up by a vine, and thereupon wounded by the spear of Achilles. They also shew a certain interdependence on one another; thus, the allusions, in the first Stasimon,, to the places where Dionysus is worshipped, find their echo in the reference to the god's own haunts in the second; the longing for liberty expressed in the second is after an interval caught up by a similar strain in the third; while the moral reflexions of the first are to some extent repeated in the last. The only other course would have involved having a chorus that was either coldly neutral, or actually hostile to the worship of Dionysus, and therefore out of harmony with the object of the play. lxix where, shortly before the tumult of the wild revels of the IValplorisnaci/t, we find Faust quietly talking to Mephistopheles about the charm of silently threading the mazes of the valleys, and of climbing the crags from which the ever-babbling fountain falls, when the breath of spring has already wakened the birch into life, and is just quickening the lingering pine'. In these denunciations of r') o'oro/v, are we really listening to the pupil of Anaxagoras, to him whom his Athenian admirers called the 'philosopher of the stage2,' to the most book-learned of the great Tragic writers of 1 Bathos of this kind is unavoidable whenever the didactic style of poetry follows closely on an instance of a higher type. 158 E, 6 KIv Kh'b S o VTro S 0X6'o0-os, Vitruvius, Book v III, Preface. Mr King informs me that he doubts the antiquity of the ' Florentine gem,' and he suggests that it may be only a fancy sketch. CADMUS ATTACKING THE SERPENT OF THE FOUNTAIN OF ARES. The wounded king of Mysia, with his helmet on his head and with shield and sword beside him, is here bending as a suppliant at an altar on which stands the oracular head of the bearded Dionysus. A., who has kindly permitted its publication, for the first time, in this volume. The original is a sard in the Leake Collection of Gems in the Fitzwilliam Museum (Case II, no. Mr King's catalogue describes it as 'designed with much spirit in the later Greek style.' LITERATURE OF THE PLA Y.

]]Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W.

' lartens-Schaafhausen cabinet' Dionysos Leontomorphos. It is doubtless undramatic for the king, after ordering his attendants to capture all the Theban revellers they can find, as well as the Lydian stranger, to allow a band of Asiatic women to go on beating their drums, and dancing and singing unmolested in front of his own palace'. A chorus of aged Thebans, for instance, might have required no departure from dramatic probability, but it would have been a poor exchange for our revel-band of Oriental women, gaily clad in bright attire and singing jubilant songs, as they lightly move to the sound of Bacchanalian music. 512, observzatum est a quibusdam senarios i ps minus 50 priminum pcdema anapaeslu hzabere, et in 950 versibus solutiones 368 esse. present play we have the advantage of two such passages, in which the revels on Cithaeron and the death of Pentheus are described in narratives which are, perhaps, unsurpassed in Greek tragedy for radiant brilliancy, energetic swiftness and the vivid representation of successive incidents, following fast on one another. WVe have a similar instance of repose in Shakespeare in the short dialogue between Duncan and Banquo just as they approach the gates of Macbeth's castle (l Iacbeth I. I-9); upon which it was well observed by Sir Joshua Reynolds that 'their conversation very naturally turns upon the beauty of its situation, and the pleasantness of the air: and Banquo observing the martlets' nests in every recess of the cornice, remarks that where those birds most breed and haunt, the air is delicate. This is well shewn by the moralising refrain at the close of the successive stanzas in one of Wordsworth's poems of the imagination, called' Devotional incitements.' For this illustration I am indebted to Professor Colvin. ON THE PURPOSE OF THE PLA Y lxxv antiquity, who, in the phrase of a hostile critic, is made to describe himself as 'from the scrolls of lore distilling the essence of his wit"? The fate of his Phoenician comrades is ingeniously indicated by the overturned pitcher. Telephus, according to the legend, had at first repelled the Greeks; but Dionysus came to their help, and caused him to be tripped up by a vine, and thereupon wounded by the spear of Achilles.

They also shew a certain interdependence on one another; thus, the allusions, in the first Stasimon,, to the places where Dionysus is worshipped, find their echo in the reference to the god's own haunts in the second; the longing for liberty expressed in the second is after an interval caught up by a similar strain in the third; while the moral reflexions of the first are to some extent repeated in the last. The only other course would have involved having a chorus that was either coldly neutral, or actually hostile to the worship of Dionysus, and therefore out of harmony with the object of the play. lxix where, shortly before the tumult of the wild revels of the IValplorisnaci/t, we find Faust quietly talking to Mephistopheles about the charm of silently threading the mazes of the valleys, and of climbing the crags from which the ever-babbling fountain falls, when the breath of spring has already wakened the birch into life, and is just quickening the lingering pine'. In these denunciations of r') o'oro/v, are we really listening to the pupil of Anaxagoras, to him whom his Athenian admirers called the 'philosopher of the stage2,' to the most book-learned of the great Tragic writers of 1 Bathos of this kind is unavoidable whenever the didactic style of poetry follows closely on an instance of a higher type. 158 E, 6 KIv Kh'b S o VTro S 0X6'o0-os, Vitruvius, Book v III, Preface. Mr King informs me that he doubts the antiquity of the ' Florentine gem,' and he suggests that it may be only a fancy sketch. CADMUS ATTACKING THE SERPENT OF THE FOUNTAIN OF ARES. The wounded king of Mysia, with his helmet on his head and with shield and sword beside him, is here bending as a suppliant at an altar on which stands the oracular head of the bearded Dionysus. A., who has kindly permitted its publication, for the first time, in this volume. The original is a sard in the Leake Collection of Gems in the Fitzwilliam Museum (Case II, no. Mr King's catalogue describes it as 'designed with much spirit in the later Greek style.' LITERATURE OF THE PLA Y.

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